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89th District Court

CRIMINAL DIVISION

WHAT IS AN ARRAIGNMENT?

When charged with a felony or misdemeanor offense, a persons first appearance is in the District Court for arraignment.

At the arraignment, the judge or magistrate will advise a person of the following:

  • What criminal charges are being brought against a person.
  • What the penalties are for the criminal charge being brought.
  • Advise a person of their constitutional rights.
  • Notify whether or not a person is eligible to be released on bond, and the amount of the bond
  • Advise the person of their right to an attorney. If requesting a court appointed attorney the form is available at the court or you can click on the link below:

If arrested for a felony, normally the arraignment follows the day after the arrest. Felony arraignments are held before a judge or magistrate who sets the case for a felony pre-trial within approximately one week and a preliminary examination within 14 calendar days following arraignment. If eligible and able to post bond, a person is released to appear on the next scheduled date. If not eligible for a bond or unable to post the set bond, a person is remanded to the county jail until the scheduled preliminary examination date.

FELONY PRE-TRIAL

For individuals arraigned on felony charges, the felony pretrial is the next step of the legal process. The defendant must appear at the pretrial hearing. An individual has the right to be represented by legal counsel at this hearing. You may hire your own attorney, or if you are indigent, you may petition the court for a court appointed attorney. Forms are available at the court or you can click here.

A felony pre-trial is scheduled prior to a preliminary examination in a felony matter. It is a hearing between the defendant, defendant's attorney and prosecutor. This is an opportunity for both parties to discuss the case and possibly resolve the case. If the case can be resolved, the court will take the plea or waiver on the date of the pre-trial. If the case is not resolved, all parties will be required to appear for the preliminary examination.

A pre-trial form will be completed and filed with the court the day of the pre-trial. 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION

After a pre-trial on a felony charge, the next step in the legal process is to appear before the District Court judge for a preliminary examination. The county prosecuting attorney will be in court to present the prosecution's case. After hearing the evidence presented at the preliminary examination, the judge determines if there is probable cause to believe that a crime was committed and whether or not there is probable cause to believe that the defendant committed that crime.  

It is suggested that legal counsel represent you at this hearing. You may hire your own attorney or if you are indigent, you may petition the court for a court appointed attorney. Forms are available at the court.

If the judge determines that there is probable cause (sufficient evidence) to believe that a crime was committed and that defendant committed that crime, the case is bound over for arraignment/pre-trial on the information in circuit court. (53rd Circuit Court).

PRE-TRIAL HEARING

For individuals arrested and arraigned on misdemeanor violations, the pretrial hearing is the next step of the legal process. Defendant must appear at the pretrial hearing. An individual has the right to be represented by legal counsel at this hearing, however it is not mandatory.

A pre-trial hearing is a hearing between the defendant/defendant's attorney and the prosecuting/city attorney. This hearing is an opportunity for both parties to discuss the case and possibly resolve the case by way of a plea, either to the offense charged or if offered, a reduced offense.  

A pre-trial form will be completed and returned to the court the day of the pre-trial. 

FINAL PRE-TRIAL

If a misdemeanor case cannot be resolved at pre-trial hearing, the court will set a final pre-trial date prior to setting it for trial. This is an opportunity for the parties to discuss the case further and decide whether the case will go to trial.

Depending on the pre-trial results, a case can take one of two paths in the judicial process. If it is defendant's intent to plead guilty or no contest, a plea will be accepted and the sentencing will follow.  If defendant's intent is to plead not guilty and have a trial, all parties will have to appear for the scheduled jury selection and trial date, unless the defendant advises the court they wish to waive their right to a jury trial and request a bench trial. A bench trial is heard and decided on before a judge.

WHO DO I CONTACT IF I HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT A CASE?

You can contact the clerk if you have procedural questions. Clerks cannot give legal advice. It is recommended that you talk to an attorney for legal information/advice.

WHERE DO I GO IF I WANT TO POST BOND FOR SOMEONE BEING ARRAIGNED AT THE DISTRICT COURT?

During regular court business hours, bond is accepted at the District Court office. After hours, bond is accepted at the county jail.

District Judge
Maria I. Barton

Office
870 S. Main Street
P.O. Box 70
Cheboygan, MI 49721
(231) 627-8809
Fax: (231) 627-8444

Hours
8:00 am - 4:30 pm

M-F(excluding holidays)

Additional Staff
Court Administrator
Jodi Barrette
(231) 627-8809
Criminal
Fax: 231-627-8444
(231) 627-8809
Civil
Fax: 231-627-8444
(231) 627-8839
Traffic
Fax: 231-627-8444
(231) 627-8853